Modern Aspects of Articular Cartilage Biochemistry

  • K. E. Kuettner
  • E. J.-M. A. Thonar
  • M. B. Aydelotte
Conference paper
Part of the Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin book series (VDGINNERE, volume 95)

Abstract

Articular cartilage is a specialized form of connective tissue which covers the ends of the bones in synovial joints. It supplies elasticity and resistance to compressive forces thereby protecting the more rigid underlying bone and ensuring smooth articulation at the joint surfaces. Cartilage has a very prominent extracellular matrix which is produced and maintained by relatively few cells, the chondrocytes (See recent reviews, [1–3]). The two major matrix constituents synthesized by these cells are collagens and proteoglycans (PGs). The remainder includes other proteins, the functions of which are poorly understood, as well as, lipids, nutrients and inorganic material.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. E. Kuettner
    • 1
  • E. J.-M. A. Thonar
    • 1
  • M. B. Aydelotte
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryRush Medical CollegeChicagoDeutschland

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