Enterovirus RNA Sequences in Hearts with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Pathogenetic Link Between Virus Infection and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

  • L. C. Archard
  • N. E. Bowles
  • L. Cunningham
  • C. A. Freeke
  • P. Morgan-Capner
  • E. G. J. Olsen
  • N. R. Banner
  • M. L. Rose
  • M. H. Yacoub
  • B. T. Meany
  • P. J. Richardson

Abstract

An association between enterovirus infection of myocardium and heart muscle disease has been established by the use of virus-specific molecular hybridisation probes under circumstances where the isolation of infectious virus or the immunocytochemical demonstration of virus antigens is generally not possible [3]. It is widely accepted that enteroviruses are major aetiological agents of inflammatory heart muscle disease [6, 7], and we have detected enteroviral RNA in endomyocardial biopsy samples from six of ten histologically proven cases of acute myocarditis [2]. However, patients are rarely biopsied at this early stage, and we have been concerned with the persistence of enteroviral RNA in myocardium in the progression from healing myocarditis to so-called idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy [1] and even end-stage disease requiring cardiac transplantation [3].

Keywords

Cardiomyopathy Myopathy Myocarditis Bete Sera 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. C. Archard
  • N. E. Bowles
  • L. Cunningham
  • C. A. Freeke
  • P. Morgan-Capner
  • E. G. J. Olsen
  • N. R. Banner
  • M. L. Rose
  • M. H. Yacoub
  • B. T. Meany
  • P. J. Richardson

There are no affiliations available

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