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Insights into Immunoregulation and Pathogenesis from a Third World Disease

  • B. R. Bloom
  • P. Salgame
  • J. Chan
  • V. Mehra
  • S. Snapper
  • X. Fan
  • R. Modlin
  • T. Rea
  • M. Brenner
  • P. Brennan
  • J. Convit
  • W. R. JacobsJr.

Abstract

To understand the pathogenesis of any disease that afflicts people primarily in developing countries, one must have some appreciation of that context. It is difficult to comprehend the quality of life found in the 40 poorest countries in 1988 where per capita income is $310/yr, 21% of women are allowed to become literate, 17% of the rural population has access to clean water, and there is 1 physician for 6,050 people (World Development Report, 1988). Life expectancy is 46 years, infant mortality is 136/1000 births and 31% of children suffer from malnutrition. Despite those grim statistics, the number of children in developing countries immunized with the basic childhood vaccines of diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, measles, polio and tuberculosis has risen from 5% to over 60% in the past 15 years, largely due to the efforts of WHO and UNICEF. Clearly vaccines represent the most cost-effective measure, aside from hand washing, for the improvement of health in the Third World. Immunologists have a unique contribution to make — and special responsibility — in this area. The challenge is not merely to develop better strategies for treating and preventing diseases of the Third World, but doing so by means that can be afforded and implemented in the developing countries. This paper will argue that study of certain, often neglected diseases occurring primarily in the Third World offers much insight into fundamental and general problems of immunoregulation and immunity to infection.

Keywords

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis World Development Report Mycobacterial Antigen Lepromatous Leprosy Mycobacterium Leprae 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Bloom
  • P. Salgame
  • J. Chan
  • V. Mehra
  • S. Snapper
  • X. Fan
  • R. Modlin
  • T. Rea
  • M. Brenner
  • P. Brennan
  • J. Convit
  • W. R. JacobsJr.

There are no affiliations available

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