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Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in Induced Papilloma, Skin, Mouse

  • Sabine Rehm
  • Jerrold M. Ward
  • Deborah E. Devor
Part of the Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals book series (LABORATORY)

Abstract

Most frequently, squamous cell carcinomas are studied in skin-painting studies (complete carcinogenesis or initiation-promotion regimens) and are identified as arising from induced papillomas, keratoacanthomas, or epidermal inclusion cysts (Shubik et al. 1953; Foulds 1954). Squamous cell carcinomas are also seen developing within the epidermis without preceding neoplastic lesions or in association with ulcers (Bogovski 1979; Klein-Szanto 1984; Knutsen et al. 1986). Characteristic clinical features of squamous cell carcinomas developing from papillomas are loss of the papillomatous stalk and wartlike appearance, followed by ulceration of the papillomas and crater formation. The borders are elevated and poorly demarcated (Bogovski 1979; Knutsen et al. 1986). The neoplasms grow rapidly and may bleed severely.

Synonyms

Squamous cell carcinoma malignant transformation of papilloma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabine Rehm
  • Jerrold M. Ward
  • Deborah E. Devor

There are no affiliations available

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