Advertisement

Update 1989 pp 348-357 | Cite as

Renal Function in Septic Shock

  • A. D. Cumming
Part of the Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine book series (UICM, volume 8)

Abstract

The association between acute renal failure (ARF) and sepsis has become increasingly important, as other types of ARF, e.g. obstetric emergencies, have become less common [1]. Sepsis now accounts for more chan 50% of cases of ARF in many centers. Nevertheless the pathogenesis of this syndrome remains poorly understood and treatment remains largely empirical.

Keywords

Septic Shock Acute Renal Failure Pulmonary Capillary Wedge Pressure Sodium Excretion Renal Plasma Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Wilkins RG, Faragher EB (1983) Acute renal failure in an intensive care unit: incidence, prediction and outcome. Anaesthesia 38:628–634PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Coalson JJ (1986) Pathology of sepsis, septic shock and multiple organ failure. In: Sibbald WJ, Sprung CL (eds) Perspectives on sepsis and septic shock. Society of Critical Care Medicine, Fullerton, Ca., pp 27–59Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Walker JF, Cumming AD, Lindsay RM, Solez K, Linton AL (1986) The renal response produced by nonhypotensive sepsis in a large animal model. Am J Kidney Dis 8:88–97PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wardle N (1982) Acute renal failure in the 1980’s: the importance of septic shock and endotoxemia. Nephron 30:193–200PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kaloyanides GJ, Pastoriza-Munoz E (1980) Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity. Kidney Int 18:571–582PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Watters JM, Wilmore DW (1986) Metabolic responses to sepsis and septic shock. In: Sibbald WJ, Sprung CL (eds) Perspectives on sepsis and septic shock. Society of Critical Care Medicine, Fullerton, Ca., pp 97–111Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Priebe HJ (1988) Ventilation and the kidney. In: JL Vincent (ed) Update in intensive care and emergency medicine, vol. 5: Update 1988. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York Tokyo, pp 679–683Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Richmond JM, Walker JF, Avila A et al (1985) Renal and cardiovascular response to nonhypotensive sepsis in a large animal model with peritonitis. Surgery 97:205–214PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Wichterman KA, Baur AE, Chaudry IH (1980) Sepsis and septic shock — a review of laboratory models and a proposal. J Surg Res 29:189–201PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Finley RJ (1986) Animal models for the study of sepsis and septic shock In: Sibbald WJ, Sprung CL (eds) Perspectives on sepsis and septic shock. Society of Critical Care Medicine, Fullerton, Ca., pp 11–26Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Cumming AD, Driedger AA, McDonald JWD, Lindsay RM, Solez K, Linton AL (1988) Vasoactive hormones in the renal response to systemic sepsis. Am J Kidney Dis 11:23–32PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Cumming AD, Kline R, Linton AL (1988) Association between renal and sympathetic responses to nonhypotensive systemic sepsis. Crit Care Med 16 (in press)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Cumming AD, Linton AL (1988) Effect of isovolemic reduction in plasma protein concentration on renal function. Abstracts, European Dialysis and Transplant Association, Madrid, September 1988, p 3Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Navar LG, Rosivall L (1984) Contribution of the renin — angiotensin system to the control of intrarenal hemodynamics. Kidney Int 25:857–868PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Scicli AG, Carretero OA (1986) Renal kallikrein-kinin system. Kidney Int 29:120–130PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Gerber JG, Anderson RJ, Schrier RW, et al (1982) Prostaglandins and the regulation of renal circulation and function. Adv Prostaglandin Thromboxane Leukotriene Res 11:493–498Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Mene P, Simonson M, Rettberg C, Dunn M (1985) Thromboxane A2 and endoperoxide analogs contract cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells. Abstracts, Americal Society of Nephrology, p 191AGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Shoemaker WC (1986) Hemodynamic and oxygen transport patterns in septic shock: physiologic mechanisms and therapeutic implications. In: Sibbald WJ, Sprung CL (eds) Perspectives on sepsis and septic shock. Society of Critical Care Medicine, Fullerton, Ca., pp 203–234Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Albertini R, Ladron DE, Guevara R, et al (1981) Effect of renal nerve stimulation on urine and tissue kininogenase activity in cats. Hypertension 3:50–54Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Cumming AD, McDonald JWD, Lindsay RM, Solez K, Linton AL (1988) The protective effect of thromboxane synthetase inhibition on renal function in systemic sepsis. Am J Kidney Dis (in press)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Cumming

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations