Persistent Infections of Fish Cell Lines by Paramyxovirus Isolates from Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

  • C. N. Lannan
  • C. K. Arakawa
  • J. R. Winton
  • J. L. Fryer

Abstract

We have reported the isolation of a paramyxovirus from stocks of adult chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to coastal rivers of Oregon, USA (Winton et al 1985). The isolates were obtained from kidney and spleen tissues using the chinook salmon embryo cell line, CHSE-214. Initial cytopathic effect (CPE) was slow to develop, requiring 28 days incubation at 18°C. The virus replicated in CHSE-214, chum heart (CHH-1), kokanee ovary (K0-6), coho salmon embryo (CSE-119), and fathead minnow (FHM) cell lines where it produced a lytic type of CPE.

Keywords

Chloroform Titration Interferon Measle Aqua 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ahne W (1977) Persistent infection in CHSE-214 cells with IPN virus isolated from pike (Esox lucius). Bull Off Int Epiz 87: 415–416Google Scholar
  2. Choppin PW, Compans RW (1975) Reproduction of paramyxoviruses. In: Fraenkel-Conrat H, Wagner R (eds) Comprehensive Virology, Vol 4. Plenum, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Engleking M, Leong J (1980) IHNV persistently infects chinook salmon embryo cells. Virol 109: 47–58Google Scholar
  4. Fujinami RS, Oldstone MBA (1984) Antibody initiates viral persistence: Immune modulation and measles virus infection. In: Notkins AL, Oldstone MBA (eds) Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis. Springer-Verlag, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Hedrick RP, Fryer JL (1981) Persistent infection of three salmonid cell lines with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). Fish Pathol 15: 163–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hedrick RP, Fryer JL (1982) Persistent infections of salmonid cell lines with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV): A model for the carrier state in trout. Fish Pathol 16: 163–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hedrick RP, Leong JC, Fryer JL (1978) Persistent infections in salmonid fish cells with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). J Fish Dis 1: 297–308CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Holland JJ, Kennedy SIT, Semler BL, Jones CL, Roux L, Grabau EA (1980) Defective interfering RNA viruses and the host-cell response. In: Fraenkel-Conrat H, Wagner RR (eds) Comprehensive Virology Vol 16. Plenum, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Joklik WK (1985) Interferons. In: Fields BN, Knipe DM, Channock RM, Melnick J, Roizman B, Shope R (eds) Virology. Raven, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. Kauffman RS and Fields BN (1985) Pathogenesis of viral infections. In: Fields BN, Knipe DM, Channock RM, Melnick J, Roizman, B Shope R (eds) Virology. Raven, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  11. Kennedy JC, MacDonald RD (1982) Persistent infection with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus mediated by defective-interfering (DI) particles in a cell line showing strong interference but little DI replication. J Gen Virol 58: 361–371PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kingsbury DW (1977) Paramyxoviruses. In: Nayak D (ed) The Molecular Biology of Animal Viruses. Marcel Dekker, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  13. Koch EM, Neubert WJ, Hofschneider PH (1984) Lifelong persistence of paramyxovirus Sendai-6/94 in C129 mice: detection of a latent viral RNA by hybridization with a cloned genomic cDNA probe. Virol 136: 78–88CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lannan CN, Winton JR, Fryer JL (1984) Fish cell lines: Establishment and characterization of nine cell lines from salmonids. In Vitro 20: 671–676PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. MacDonald RD, Kennedy JC (1979) Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus persistently infects chinook salmon embryo cells independent of interferon. Virol 95: 260–264CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Ramig RF (1985) Principles of animal virus genetics. In: Fields BN, Knipe DM, Channock RM, Melnick J, Roizman B, Shope R (eds) Virology. Raven, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  17. Reed JL, Muench H (1938) A simple method of estimating fifty percent endpoints. Am J Hyg 27: 493–497Google Scholar
  18. White DO, Fenner F (1986) Medical Virology. Academic Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  19. Winton JR, Lannan CN, Ransom DP, Fryer JL (1985) Isolation of a new virus from chinook salmon (Oncorhvnchus tshawytscha) in Oregon USA. Fish Pathol 20: 373–380CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Wolf K, Quimby MC (1976) Procedures for subculturing fish cells and propagating fish cell lines. TCA Manual 2: 471–474CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Youngner JS, Preble OT (1980) Viral persistence: Evolution of viral populations. In: Fraenkel-Conrat H, Wagner RR (eds) Comprehensive Virology Vol 16. Plenum, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. N. Lannan
    • 1
  • C. K. Arakawa
    • 2
  • J. R. Winton
    • 2
  • J. L. Fryer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceNational Fisheries Research CenterSeattleUSA

Personalised recommendations