Breast Cancer pp 107-130 | Cite as

The Contribution of Clinical Trials to the Study of Breast Cancer

  • S. K. Carter
Part of the UICC International Union Against Cancer book series (1360)

Abstract

The purpose of oncological clinical research is to improve the care of patients with cancer. This improvement can be manifested in a variety of efficacy parameters which have become the evaluation focus of the clinical trials which comprise the bulk of clinical research. The benefit to patients from having their malignant tumors treated can be easily separated into two broad concepts. The first concept is cure and the second concept is palliation. A major problem in clinical research evaluation involves the determination of how the benefits of a given investigative regimen, or therapeutic approach, actually translate into a population-based patient care therapeutic index. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss some of the issues involved in this determination.

Keywords

Toxicity Oncol Interferon Stratification Methotrexate 

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    Bonadonna G, Valagussa P (1987) Current status of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Semin Oncol 14:8–22PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Fisher B, Fisher ER, Redmond C (1986) Ten-year results from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) clinical trial evaluating the use of L-phenylalanine mustard (l-PAM) in the management of primary breast cancer. J Clin Oncol 4:929–941PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Glucksberg H, Rivkin SE, Rasmussen S et al. (1982) Combination chemotherapy (CMFVP) versus L-phenylalanine mustard (l-PAM) for operable breast cancer with positive axillary nodes. Cancer 50:423–434PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. K. Carter

There are no affiliations available

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