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Regulation of Macrophage Cholesterol Homeostasis

  • G. Schmitz
  • B. Brennhausen
  • H. Robenek
Part of the Recent Developments in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research book series (LIPID)

Abstract

Lipoprotein receptors play a major role in the homeostasis of plasma lipoproteins. They are integrated constituents of cell membranes and bind certain lipoproteins which are then internalized by the cells. Insofar as lipoprotein receptors affect the concentration of lipoproteins in the plasma and may play a role in lipoprotein accumulation in arterial cells, they have both a direct and an indirect influence on the progression of atherosclerosis. The occurence of receptor defects [1] or structural defects of apolipoproteins [2] prevent a normal lipoprotein-receptor interaction. The abnormal lipoprotein particles thus formed are enriched with cholesteryl esters and are catabolized via a separate, so-called scavenger pathway in the macrophage system.

Keywords

Cholesteryl Ester Cholesterol Efflux Lamellar Body Unesterified Cholesterol Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Schmitz
  • B. Brennhausen
  • H. Robenek

There are no affiliations available

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