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Biology of Cortical Bone Graft Incorporation

  • H. Burchardt

Abstract

Bone transplantation has been a common surgical procedure since the early 1900s when it was used to unite fractures, fuse joints, and repair skeletal defects. The use of autogenous bone grafts for skeletal reconstruction has changed little since that time, and the incidence of success has remained high. To understand the reasons for the success of this surgical procedure, the interacting biomechanisms of bone graft repair need to be reviewed: the correct application of transplantable bone tissues is based on knowing the biological sequences that occur from the time of transplantation to the incorporation and secondary remodeling of the graft. This presentation discusses the biological and physical characteristics of autogenous cortical bone transplantation repair as studied in an experimental model and, secondarily, makes some correlations to autogenous cortical segmental grafts in man [7, 8].

Keywords

Bone Graft Autogenous Bone Graft Skeletal Defect Biomechanical Strength Graft Repair 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Burchardt
    • 1
  1. 1.Pennsylvania Regional Tissue BankScrantonUSA

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