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Heart Failure in Septic Shock

  • J. F. Dhainaut
  • Y. Le Tulzo
  • F. Brunet
Part of the Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine book series (UICM, volume 6)

Abstract

Sepsis and septic shock represent increasingly serious clinical problems in the practice of a wide variety of specialities: internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics and pediatrics. This is essentially due to the growing application of immunosuppressive chemotherapy and the increasing use of diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures. Shock secondary to sepsis results in a high mortality rate in spite of significant advances in antimicrobial therapies [1].

Keywords

Cardiac Output Septic Shock Septic Patient Coronary Perfusion Pressure Circ Shock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. Dhainaut
  • Y. Le Tulzo
  • F. Brunet

There are no affiliations available

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