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Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Nucleic Acids

  • G. J. ThomasJr.
  • A. H.-J. Wang
Part of the Nucleic Acids and Molecular Biology book series (NUCLEIC, volume 2)

Abstract

Recent applications of the technique of single crystal X-ray diffraction, in combination with structure refinement methods, have revealed architectural details of right- and left-handed DNA helices at atomic resolution. [For comprehensive reviews of this work, see the monograph edited by Jurnak and McPherson (Jurnak and McPherson 1985).] Structural details of DNA in complexes with regulatory proteins (Anderson et al. 1987) and anti-tumor drugs (Wang 1987) have also been probed by crystallographic methods. Together these studies provide a wealth of information about the conformational properties of DNA, including dependence upon base sequence and intercalating agents, influence of solvent and counterions, and complementarity between DNA and substrate surfaces. X-ray diffraction experiments which are currently in progress should provide still further information on the nature of DNA-substrate interactions, as well as new insight into long-range structural features, such as helix curvature.

Keywords

Raman Spectrum Raman Spectroscopy Raman Band Backbone Conformation Helix Axis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. J. ThomasJr.
    • 1
  • A. H.-J. Wang
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Basic Life SciencesUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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