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Vasculitis

  • N. Soter
  • T. J. Ryan
  • H. H. Wolff
  • M. Kohda
  • M. Arakawa
  • H. Ueki
Conference paper

Abstract

As an introduction, Dr. Nicholas A. Soter (USA) opened the symposium by noting that experimental studies in animal models and in humans suggest that the tissue deposition of circulating immune complexes or the local formation of immune complexes in situ are central events in the production of necrotizing vasculitis. The mechanisms of the localization of circulating immune complexes to a specific vessel site are related in part to vasoactive amines and subsequent vasopermeability alterations. Additional factors may include the participation of endothelial cell-surface receptors, abnormalities in the clearance of immune complexes by the reticuloendothelial system, and turbulence at blood vessel bifurcations. The identification of antigens in vasculitis has been accomplished in only a few conditions, notably certain infections and drugs.

Keywords

Immune Complex Arterial Wall Gelatin Sponge Membrane Attack Complex Necrotizing Vasculitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Soter
    • 1
  • T. J. Ryan
    • 2
  • H. H. Wolff
    • 3
  • M. Kohda
    • 4
  • M. Arakawa
    • 4
  • H. Ueki
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.John Radcliffe Hospital, The Slade HospitalHaedington, OxfordGreat Britain
  3. 3.Department of Dermatology and VenerologyUniversity of LübeckLübeckGermany
  4. 4.Department of DermatologyKawasaki Medical SchoolKurashikiJapan

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