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Stereotypes and User Modeling

  • Elaine Rich
Part of the Symbolic Computation book series (SYMBOLIC)

Abstract

A stereotype represents a collection of attributes that often co-occur in people. Stereotypes can play an important role in a user modeling system because they enable the system to make a large number of plausible inferences on the basis of a substantially smaller number of observations. These inferences must, however, be treated as defaults, which can be overridden by specific observations. Thus any stereotype-based user-modeling system must include techniques for nonmonotonic reasoning. This chapter will discuss the role that stereotypes can play in a user modeling system and it will outline specific techniques that can be used to implement stereotype-based reasoning in such systems.

Keywords

User Model Inference Rule Business Executive Nonmonotonic Reasoning Default Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine Rich

There are no affiliations available

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