Advertisement

Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Studies During Functional Tests in Aphasic Stroke Patients

  • G. Demeurisse
  • A. Capon
Part of the Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurologie book series (VDGNEUROLOGIE, volume 4)

Abstract

After a stroke, the early establishment of a precise prognosis is of the highest importance both for the patient and for the community. Obviously, a better understanding of the mechanisms of recovery could be of help for this assessment.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Castro-Caldas A, Silveria Bothelho M (1980) Dichotic listening in the recovery of aphasia after stroke. Brain Lang 10:145–151PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Celesia G, Polycyn R, Holden J, Nickles R, Koeppe R, Gatley S (1984) Determination of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral infarction Use of Fluoromethane labeled with Fluorine 18 and positron emission tomography. Arch Neurol 41:262–267PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cooper R, Papakostopoulos D, Crow H (1975) Rapid changes of cortical oxygen associated with motor and cognitive functions in man. In: Harper M, Jennet B, Miller D, Rowan J (eds) Blood flow and metabolism in the brain. Livingstone, EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Demeurisse G, Capon A (1985) Functional cortical reorganization during the recovery from aphasia. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 5:S35–S36Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Demeurisse G ,Capon A (1985) Does the right hemisphere contribute to language recovery in Broca’s and Wernicke’s aphasias? J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 7:142Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Demeurisse G, Demol O, Robaye E, Coekaerts M-J, de Beuckelaer R, Derouck M (1979) Quantitative evaluation of aphasia resulting from a cerebral vascular accident. Neuropsychologia 17:55–65PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Demeurisse G ,Demol O, Derouck M, de Beuckelaer R, Coekaerts M-J, Capon A (1980) Quantitative study of the rate of recovery from aphasia due to ischemic stroke. Stroke 11:455–458PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Demeurisse G ,Verhas M, Capon A (1981) New functional organization in the cortex after brain infarction: A regional cerebral blood flow study. Excerpta Med 548:333Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Demeurisse G, Verhas M, Capon A (1982) Debits sanguins cérébraux et recuperation du langage: evolution et relations. In: Seron X, Laterre C (eds) Réeduquer le cerveau. Mardaga, BruxellesGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Demeurisse G, Verhas M, Capon A, Demol O (1982) Regional cortical activation during a naming test in aphasia. A rCBF study with 133 Xenon inhalation method. In: Raynaud C (ed) Nuclear medicine and biology. Pergamon, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Demeurisse G, Capon A, Verhas M (1983) Clinical and rCBF sequential study during the recovery from aphasia. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 3:S282–S293Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Demeurisse G, Verhas M, Capon A, Paternot J (1983) Lack of evolution of the cerebral blood flow during clinical recovery of a stroke. Stroke 14:77–81PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Demeurisse G, Verhas M, Capon A (1984) Resting CBF sequential study during recovery from aphasia due to ischemic stroke. Neuropsychologia 22:241–246PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Demeurisse G, Capon A, Verhas M (1985) Prognostic value of computed tomography in aphasic stroke patients. Eur Neurol 24:134–139PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Demeurisse G, Verhas M, Capon A (1985) The prognostic value of rCBF measurements in aphasic strok patients. In: Hartmann A, Hoyer S (eds) Cerebral blood flow and metabolism measurement. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York TokyoGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Johnson J, Sommers R, Weidner W (1977) Dichotic ear preference in aphasia. J Speech Hear Res 20:116–129PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Kohlemeyer K (1975) Dynamic speech studies by measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in aphasic and non aphasic cases. In: Harper M, Jennett B, Miller D, Rowan J (eds) Blood flow and metabolism in the brain. Livingstone, EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Maximilian V, Prohovnik I, Risberg J (1980) Cerebral hemodynamic response to mental activation in normoand hypercapnia. Stroke 11:342–347PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Obrist W, Thompson H, Wang H, Wilkinson W (1975) Regional cerebral blood flow estimated by 133 Xenon inhalation. Stroke 6:245–256PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Pettit J, Noll J (1979) Cerebral dominance in aphasia recovery. Brain Lang 7:191–200PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Raichle M, Grubb R, Mokhtar H, Eichung J, Ter-Pogossian M (1976) Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism. Arch Neurol 33:523–526PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Reivich M (1974) Blood flow metabolism couple in brain. In: Plenum F (ed): Brain dysfunction in metabolic disorders. Raven, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Risberg J, Ingvar D (1973) Patterns of activation in the gray matter of the dominant hemisphere. Brain 96:737–756PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Soh K, Larsen B, Skinhjøj E, Lassen N (1978) Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia. Arch Neurol 35:625–632PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Demeurisse
  • A. Capon

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations