Sepsis pp 23-34 | Cite as

Pathophysiology of Sepsis and Septic Shock

  • J. N. Sheagren

Abstract

I define sepsis as the clinical situation in which the immediately available clinical data indicate that the patient is likely to be infected, and septic shock as a state of hypotension in the setting of sepsis which has become refractory to fluid resuscitation. This definition will be expanded upon in the next section (“Practical Definition of Septic Shock”). It is important to understand that patients who develop septic shock as defined above have an extremely poor prognosis: Some 70%–90% of those who develop septic shock die [1].

Keywords

Dopamine Corticosteroid Histamine Glucocorticoid Bilirubin 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

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  • J. N. Sheagren

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