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Sepsis pp 148-160 | Cite as

Changes in the Microcirculation in Sepsis and Septic Shock

  • K. Messmer
  • U. Kreimeier
  • F. Hammersen

Abstract

Sepsis and septic shock are characterized by a “mismatch” of oxygen supply and oxygen demand [7]. While in the initial state cardiac output is normal or above normal, and systemic vascular resistance is reduced, the difference between arterial and mixed venous oxygen content is low, indicating the inability of tissues to extract oxygen from arterial blood. This hyperdynamic circulatory state, first described by Waisbren [39], turns into hypodynamic septic shock in the later phases of the disease. It is generally assumed that inadequate oxygen extraction and the transition from the hyperdynamic to the hypodynamic state are due to microcirculatory failure [38]. Since the prognosis of hypodynamic septic shock remains poor, despite all efforts to treat these patients in intensive care units, it is essential to diagnose septic shock at its very onset, while still in the hyperdynamic state.

Keywords

Septic Shock Total Peripheral Resistance Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Focal Ischemia Microvascular Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Messmer
  • U. Kreimeier
  • F. Hammersen

There are no affiliations available

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