Miscellaneous Dyes

  • Paul Francis Gordon
  • Peter Gregory
Part of the Springer Study Edition book series (SSE)

Abstract

Having discussed the two most important dye classes, namely azos and anthraquinones, we shall now consider six other important dye types. These are: —
  1. l.

    Vat

     
  2. 2.

    Indigoid

     
  3. 3.

    Phthalocyanines

     
  4. 4.

    Polymethines

     
  5. 5.

    Aryl carboniums, and

     
  6. 6.

    Nitro and Nitroso dyes.

     

Keywords

Aniline Naphthol Phenolphthalein Diphenylamine Phthalimide 

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Bibliography

A. Vat Dyes

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C. The Phthalocyanines

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D. Polymethines

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F. Nitro (and Nitroso) Dyes

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  2. 2.
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  3. 3.
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    Krahler, S. E.: Miscellaneous dyes. In: The chemistry of synthetic dyes and pigments, Lubs, H. A. (ed.), pp. 254–259. New York: Reinhold 1955Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Francis Gordon
    • 1
  • Peter Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.PLC Organics DivisionImperial Chemical IndustriesBlackley, ManchesterUK

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