Advertisement

Heat Pulse Attenuation and Magnetothermal Resistance in Li-doped Si

  • A. J. Kent
  • V. W. Rampton
  • T. Miyasato
  • L. J. Challis
  • M. I. Newton
  • P. A. Russell
  • N. P. Hewett
  • G. A. Hardy
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences book series (SSSOL, volume 68)

Abstract

Lithium impurities behave as shallow donors in Si, they are believed to occupy an interstitial site. The six-fold valley degeneracy and the tetrahedral symmetry give rise to the usual ground state levels 2A1, 2E and 2T2. These levels are inverted with respect to those of a substitutional group V ion. The lower levels are then the approximately degenerate 2E+2T2 and the excited level is 2A1 at Δ = 440GHz [1]. Theoretically a phonon-induced T2→ A1 transition is symmetry forbidden; the deformation Hamiltonian transforms as A1 +E [2], the resonant scattering should therefore be from E→A1 and only scatter phonons producing E type distortions. We have tested this prediction using heat pulses. The orbital degeneracy, E+T2 should also lead to scattering from within the ground state which is not the case in the group V systems. This scattering is likely to be very sensitive to strain and it now seems clear that some of the early experiments were significantly affected by random strains probably caused by the relatively high concentrations of C and 0 present in Si available at that time. This can be seen in the strong scattering observed in the thermal conductivity below 1K which has been attributed to ground state splittings of 50GHz in about 20% of the Li ions [3]. A further interesting aspect is the likelihood of Jahn-Teller effects, which could significantly modify the phonon scattering [4].

Keywords

Phonon Scattering Heat Pulse Resonant Scattering Cadmium Sulphide Type Distortion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    L. Aggarwal, P. Fisher, Y. Mourzine and A.K. Ramdas, Phys. Rev. 138, A882, (1965)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    C. Herring and E. Vogt, Phys. Rev. 101, 944, (1956)CrossRefMATHADSGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. Adolf, D. Fortier, J. H. Albany and K. Suzuki, Phys. Rev. B21, 5651, (1980)ADSGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Puhl, E. Sigmund and J. Maier, Phys. Rev. B32, 8234, (1985)ADSGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    T. Miyasato, M. Tokumura and F. Akao, J. de Physique, C6, 658, (1981)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Zeile and K. Lassmann, Phys. stat. sol. (b), 111, 555, (1982)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    L.J. Challis, A.P. Heraud, V.W. Rampton, M.K. Saker and M.N. Wybourne, Proc. 4th. Int. Conf. Phonon Scattering in Condensed Matter. Stuttgart, 1983, eds. W. Eisenmenger, K. Lassmann and S. Dottinger (Springer, Berlin) p.358Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Y.W. Rampton and M.K. Saker Proc. 2nd. Int. Conf. on Phonon Physics Budapest, 1985, eds. J. Kollar, N. Kroo, N. Menyhard and T. Siklos (World Scientific, Singapore) p.684Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    W. Odoni, P. Fuchs and H.R. Ott, Phys. Rev. B28, 1314, (1983)ADSGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    T. Ishiguro and S. Morita, Appl. Phys. Lett. 25, 533, (1974)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    W.A. Little, Can. J. Phys. 37, 334, (1959)CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Kent
    • 1
  • V. W. Rampton
    • 1
  • T. Miyasato
    • 2
  • L. J. Challis
    • 1
  • M. I. Newton
    • 1
  • P. A. Russell
    • 1
  • N. P. Hewett
    • 1
  • G. A. Hardy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Institute of Scientific and Industrial ResearchOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations