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The D2-Factor in Ophiostoma Ulmi: Expression and Latency

  • H. J. Rogers
  • K. W. Buck
  • C. M. Brasier
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 1)

Abstract

D-factors are genetic elements that have the potential to exert a deleterious effect on the growth and reproductive fitness of Ophiostoma ulmi, the causative agent of Dutch elm disease [1,2]. They show cytoplasmic inheritance and are readily transmitted by hyphal anastomosis to other isolates in the same vegetative-compatibility (v-c) group; less efficient transmission is also possible between isolates in different v-c groups [3]. When a d-infected donor isolate and a “healthy” recipient isolate are paired on elm sapwood agar (ESA) medium, altered sectors of growth (d-reactions) are observed in the recipient isolate on either side of the area where the two colonies initially merged. In its most severe form a d-reaction can result in almost complete cessation of growth of the recipient culture.

Keywords

Rhizoctonia Solani Cytoplasmic Inheritance dsRNA Segment Killer Strain Hyphal Anastomosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Rogers
    • 1
  • K. W. Buck
    • 1
  • C. M. Brasier
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pure and Applied BiologyImperial College of Science and TechnologyLondonUK
  2. 2.Forest Research StationAlice Holt LodgeFarnham SurreyUK

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