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Mediators and Predictors in Posttraumatic Lung Failure

  • G. Schlag
  • H. Redl
  • R. J. A. Goris
  • H. K. S. Nuytinck
Conference paper
  • 60 Downloads
Part of the Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine book series (UICM, volume 1)

Abstract

In patients with multiple injuries and hypovolemic-traumatic shock the posttraumatic course is often complicated by the “shock lung syndrome”, also known as posttraumatic ARDS. The ARDS develops as a consequence of trauma associated with hypovolemic shock, which produces the initial stage of ARDS, the “lung in shock”, or the “organ in shock” (i.e. liver, pancreas, kidney).

Keywords

Hemorrhagic Shock Neutrophil Elastase Hypovolemic Shock Fibrinogen Degradation Product Scann Electr Microscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Schlag
  • H. Redl
  • R. J. A. Goris
  • H. K. S. Nuytinck

There are no affiliations available

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