Treatment of Chronic Leukemias

  • F. W. Gunz
Part of the UICC Current Treatment of Cancer book series (1360)

Abstract

Chronic leukemias occur worldwide. There are two types-chronic myeloid (CML) or granulocytic and chronic lymphocytic (CLL). Their symptoms and physical signs differ from each other to some extent, as does their treatment. For this reason they will be described separately. Both types of chronic leukemia are rarer than the acute leukemias. In Western and many other populations CLL is more common than CML, but in Japan and elsewhere in the Far East CLL is very rarely encountered. The reason for this is unknown. CLL is a disease of late middle and old age and is never found in children. At least twice as many men as women have CLL. CML occurs occasionally in children and becomes more common as ages increase. This type is found slightly more often in males than in females.

Keywords

Leukemia Anemia Neutropenia Cyclophosphamide Thrombocytopenia 

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Further Reading

  1. Canellos GP (1982) Chronic leukemias. In: DeVita VT, Heilman S, Rosenberg SA (eds) Cancer: Principles of practice of oncology. Lippincott, Philadelphia, pp 1427–1438Google Scholar
  2. Galton DAG, Szur WL, Dacie JV (1961) The use of chlorambucil and steroids in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Br J Haematol 7: 73–98PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Karanas A, Silver RT (1968) Characteristics of the terminal phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia. Blood 32: 445PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Spiers ASD (1975) New approaches to the therapy of chronic granulocytic leukemia. Series Haematol 8: 157Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. Gunz

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