Wind-Induced Water Motion

  • P. Shanahan
  • D. R. F. Harleman
  • L. Somlyódy

Abstract

The circulation of water within a lake or reservoir is an important determinant of the lake’s water quality behavior. The two major classes of motion, horizontal and vertical, significantly influence mass transport and thus water quality. Horizontal circulations are caused by the travel of water between the inflow and the outflow of the lake and the force of wind upon the water surface. Vertical circulations interact with the differences in water density in a stratified lake and are produced when various agents disrupt the normally stable stratification. Turbulence due to wind, inflows of high- or low-density water, and heating or cooling at the water surface are typical agents.

Keywords

Stratification Beach Expense Advection Tria 

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Applied Analysis, Laxenburg/Austria 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Shanahan
  • D. R. F. Harleman
  • L. Somlyódy

There are no affiliations available

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