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A Comparison of Water Quality Models and Load Reduction Predictions

  • R. A. LuettichJr.
  • D. R. F. Harleman
Conference paper

Abstract

Recent lake water quality management efforts have attempted to balance the dual need to protect and use lakes as water resources, based on the premise that both protection and use are compatible. To be successful, managers must quantify the effects of climatic forcing, intrinsic lake characteristics, and human activity within the watershed, and select control measures to maintain predetermined water quality standards. In response to this need, computer modeling is often attempted with the hope that models calibrated to one set of data will reproduce observations contained in alternative data sets and thus can be confidently used in a predictive capacity. To date, such modeling efforts have had only marginal success.

Keywords

Nutrient Limitation Load Reduction Apply System Analysis Cell Quota Eutrophication Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Applied Analysis, Laxenburg/Austria 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. LuettichJr.
  • D. R. F. Harleman

There are no affiliations available

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