Physiology of Hearing

  • R. Klinke
Part of the Springer Study Edition book series (SSE)

Abstract

The sense of hearing is fundamental in human life; hearing and speech together offer the most important means of communication among people, and are the basis of complex social interactions. It is not surprising, then, that loss of hearing can result in severe behavioral disturbance.

Keywords

Acoustics Corti 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dallos, P.: The Auditory Periphery. New York — London: Academic Press 1973.Google Scholar
  2. Evans, E. F., Wilson, J. P.: Psychophysics and Physiology of Hearing. London: Academic Press 1977.Google Scholar
  3. Henderson, D., Hamernik, R.P., Darshan, S.D., Mills, H.H. (eds.): Effects of Noise on Hearing. New York: Raven Press 1976.Google Scholar
  4. Keidel, W. D., Neff, W. D. (eds.): Handbook of Sensory Physiology. Berlin — Heidelberg — New York: Springer Verlag 1974, 1975, 1976, Vol. V/1, Vol. V/2, Vol. V/3.Google Scholar
  5. Moore, B.C. J.: An Introduction to the Psychology of Hearing. London: Academic Press 1982.Google Scholar
  6. Pickles, J. O.: An Introduction to the Physiology of Hearing. London: Academic Press 1982.Google Scholar
  7. Roederer, J. G.: Introduction to the Physics and Psychophysics of Music, 2nd ed. Berlin —Heidelberg — New York: Springer 1975.Google Scholar
  8. Tobias, J. V. (ed.): Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory. New York: Academic Press 1970, 1972, Vol. I, Vol. II.Google Scholar
  9. Webster, W. R. Atkin, L. M.: Central auditory processing. In: Gazzaniga, M. S., Blake-More, C. (eds.) Handbook of Psychobiology. New York: Academic Press 1975.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Klinke

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations