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Hormone Treatment of Tumours

  • S. Monfardini
  • K. Brunner
  • D. Crowther
  • S. Eckhardt
  • D. Olive
  • S. Tanneberger
  • A. Veronesi
  • J. M. A. Whitehouse
  • R. Wittes
Part of the UICC International Union Against Cancer book series (UICCI)

Abstract

The administration of hormones or the suppression or antagonism of endogenous hormones may significantly inhibit the growth of certain malignant neoplasms (e.g. prostate, male and female breast and endometrium). Growth of tumours of the ovary, kidney and thyroid appear to be to some degree subject to hormonal influences; leukaemia and malignant lymphomas may also be influenced by corticosteroids.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Multiple Myeloma Fluid Retention Skin Atrophy Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Allegra JC, Simon R, Lippman MC (1979) The association between steroid hormone receptor status and the disease free interval in breast cancer. In: Adjuvant therapy of cancer, Vol. II, Salmon SE, Jones SE (Eds.). Grune & Stratton, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Bonadonna G, Valagussa P, Tancini G, Di Fronzo G (1980) Estrogenreceptor status and response to chemotherapy in early and advanced breast cancer. Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, 4:37PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Carter SK (1979) The dilemma of estrogen receptors and the response rate to cytotoxic chemotherapy. A problem of comparability analysis. Cancer Clinical Trials, 2:49PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Clarysee A, Kenis Y, Mathe G (1976) Hormonal agents used in the treatment of cancer. In: Cancer Chemotherapy, Springer-Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  5. Jensen EV (1973) Estrogen binding and clinical response of breast cancer. In: Cancer Medicine. Ed. by Holland JF, Frei E, (Eds). Lea & Febiger, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  6. Lippman ME, Allegra JC, Thompson EB, Barlock A, Green L, Huff KK, Hoan MTD, Aiken SC, Warren R (1978) The relation between estrogen receptors and response rate to cytotoxic chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. N. England J Med, 298:1233CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. McGuire WC, Carbone PP, Vollmer EP (Eds) (1975) Estrogen Receptors in Human Breast Cancer. North Holland Publishing Company, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  8. Riedman MA, Hoffman PG, and Jones HW (1978) The clinical value of hormone receptor assays in malignant disease. Cancer Treat. Reviews 5:185CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Stoll BA (Ed) (1981) Hormonal Management of Endocrine Related Cancer. Lloyd-Luke LTD., LondonGoogle Scholar
  10. Stoll BA (Ed) (1982) Endocrine Relationships in Breast Cancer. William Heinemann Med Books LTD, LondonGoogle Scholar
  11. Talley RW (1973) Corticosteroids. In: Cancer Medicine, Holland JF, Frei E, (Eds). Lea & Febiger, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Monfardini
    • 1
  • K. Brunner
    • 2
  • D. Crowther
    • 3
  • S. Eckhardt
    • 4
  • D. Olive
    • 5
  • S. Tanneberger
    • 6
  • A. Veronesi
    • 1
  • J. M. A. Whitehouse
    • 7
  • R. Wittes
    • 8
  1. 1.Centro Riferimento OncologicoAviano (Pordenone)Italy
  2. 2.Onkologie-AbteilungInselspitalBernSwitzerland
  3. 3.Manchester University and Christie Hospital and Holt Radium InstituteManchesterUK
  4. 4.National Institute of OncologyBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Service de Médécine Infantille IIHopital d’Enfants Allée du MorovanVandoeuvre-Les-NancyFrance
  6. 6.Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDRRobert-Roessle-InstitutBerlin-BuchG.D.R.
  7. 7.CRC Medical Oncology Unit, Centre Block CF99Southampton General HospitalSouthamptonUK
  8. 8.Division of Cancer Treatment, Dept. of Health, Education and WelfareNational Institute of HealthBethesdaUSA

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