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Rights and Responsibilities of Nurses as the Basis for Their Contracts with Society, with Patients, and with Colleagues

  • M. J. Flaherty
Part of the Medicolegal Library book series (MEDICOLEGAL, volume 4)

Abstract

Whenever nurses meet, they express concern about the quality and quantity of their professional practice. One always tries to define nursing. Florence Nightingale was the first (and perhaps the last!) nurse to believe that she had done this. Since her time, many definitions of nursing have been proposed, but most lend clarification to what nurses do rather than what nursing is.

Keywords

Professional Practice Nursing Practice Functional Competence Health Care Agency Master Craftsman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Flaherty

There are no affiliations available

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