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Ethical Considerations for the Nurse Ethnographer Doing Field Research in Clinical Settings

  • C. P. Germain
Part of the Medicolegal Library book series (MEDICOLEGAL, volume 4)

Abstract

Ethnography literally means “portrait of a people.” Ethnographic research provides a descriptive analysis of a subculture and is the basis for theory development in such subdisciplines as cultural, social, or educational anthropology. Traditionally anthropologists have studied remote or exotic cultures but the need for ethnographic research of the many health care subcultures where nursing is practiced has been cited by a number of nurse anthropologists.

Keywords

Ethical Dilemma Ethnographic Research Data Collection Phase Belmont Report Advocacy Role 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. P. Germain

There are no affiliations available

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