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Non-Adiabatic Processes in Field Desorption Phenomena

  • N. Shima
  • M. Tsukada
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences book series (SSSOL, volume 59)

Abstract

The field-induced desorption phenomenon [1] of surface atoms or adsorbed molecules gives direct information about the microscopic states of surface atoms. Recently qualitatively different behaviors were found between strongly adsorbed (chemisorbed) and weakly adsorbed (physisorbed) hydrogen-metal surface systems when the high electric field was applied. In the strongly adsorbed systems of hydrogen on Fe or Ni, H+ ions were detected [2]. On the other hand, in the weakly adsorbed systems of hydrogen on A1 or Cu, dominant desorbed species are metal hydride ions and the proportion of the desorbed H+ is small. Such behavior is puzzling from the usual view points of the chemical reaction, since the weaker bond might be considered harder to dissociate.

Keywords

High Electric Field Desorption Rate Airy Function Adiabatic Limit Field Evaporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E.W. Muller, T. T. Tsong: “Field Ion Microscopy, Field Ionization and Field Evaporation”, in “Progress in Surface Science, Vol.4, Part 1”, (Pergamon, Oxford, 1973)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    O. Nishikawa, T. Yoshimura, M. Shibata:(unpublished)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    O. Nishikawa, T. Yoshimura, M. Shibata: Surf. Sci. 124, 440 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Z. W. Gortel, H. J. Kreuzer, R. Teshima: Phys. Rev. B22, 5655 (1980)Google Scholar
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    R. Gomer, L. W. Swanson: J. Chem. Phys. 38, 1613 (1963)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Shima
    • 1
  • M. Tsukada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan

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