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Automatic Ventilation During Closed-Circuit Anaesthesia

  • R. M. Schepp
  • W. Erdmann
  • B. Westerkamp
  • N. S. Faithfull

Abstract

Closed-circuit anaesthesia (CCA) was used as early as 1924, by Waters, using a to-and-fro system. However, lack of proper monitoring facilities and insight into the dynamics of gas uptake and distribution prevented CCA from becoming generally accepted for the safe administration of anaesthesia. The situation has since changed and it is today possible continuously to monitor oxygen, carbon dioxide and anaesthetic vapour concentrations. Additionally, knowledge of pulmonary pathophysiology has increased tremendously, with the result that employment of CCA may now be regarded as just as safe a way of administering anaesthesia as any other.

Keywords

Nitrous Oxide Functional Residual Capacity Closed Circuit Automatic Ventilation Circuit Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Wagner PD, Saltzman HA, West JB (1974) Clinical scope and utility of carbon dioxide filtration in inhalation anesthesia. J Appl Physiol 36:588PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Waters RM (1924) Measurement of continous distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios. Curr Res Anaesth 3:68Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Schepp
  • W. Erdmann
  • B. Westerkamp
  • N. S. Faithfull

There are no affiliations available

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