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In Vitro Diagnosis in the Nuclear Medical Laboratory

  • W. G. Wood
Chapter
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Part of the Handbuch der medizinischen Radiologie / Encyclopedia of Medical Radiology book series (HDBRADIOL, volume 15 / 3)

Abstract

There has probably never been a method which has been so widely applicable in the field of in-vitro diagnosis as radioimmunoassay or its variations. The use of the antigen-antibody reaction with its specificity, coupled with the use of radioactive ligands, has led to sensitive methods which now form a routine part of laboratory in-vitro diagnostic programmes. In nuclear medicine in its classical sense, the best example of the combination of in-vivo and in-vitro methods using radioactive tracers is in the field of thyroid disorders.

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References

a) Milestones in radioligand assays

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1985

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  • W. G. Wood

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