Determining 3-D Motion and Structure of a Rigid Body Using Straight Line Correspondences

  • B. L. Yen
  • T. S. Huang
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 2)

Abstract

This paper investigates the determination of 3-D motion and structure of a rigid body containing straight line segments, given a sequence of (2-D) perspective views. Central projections of 3-D lines over the image sequence are used, and line correspondences are assumed to be given. The approach is to use central projection on the unit sphere in the analysis. Three basic types of rigid motion are considered — pure rotation about an axis through the origin, pure translation, and a general rigid motion.

For the two frame case, the determination of a general rigid motion requires that the 3-D lines lie on set(s) of planar surfaces. The methods are analogous to methods based on point correspondences. In some cases, a combination of point and line correspondences can be used. For the three frame case, no restriction on the 3-D line configuration is required for the determination of a general rigid motion. Also described briefly are some 3-D methods.

Keywords

Paral 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. L. Yen
    • 1
  • T. S. Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Coordinated Science LaboratoryUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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