Current View of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System

  • R. van Furth
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 27)

Abstract

During the last 20 years considerable attention has been given to the origin of macrophages. Until recently macrophages localized in various tissues were believed to be a kind of phagocytic connective tissue cell that renews itself by division. It has also been thought by some that fibroblasts transform into macrophages and by others that macrophages derive from lymphocytes.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Influenza Sarcoma Prostaglandin Stein 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York 1981

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  • R. van Furth

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