Dynamics of Proton Transfer in Solution

  • P. Schuster
  • P. Wolschann
  • K. Tortschanoff
Part of the Molecular Biology Biochemistry and Biophysics book series (MOLECULAR, volume 24)

Abstract

Proton transfer reactions in principle belong to the simplest possible chemical processes, since only a naked proton is exchanged between the two molecules concerned.

Keywords

Cyclohexane Azole Tritium Thiourea CH3CN 

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References

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin.Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Schuster
  • P. Wolschann
  • K. Tortschanoff

There are no affiliations available

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