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Information Systems in Ambulatory Care

  • Carlos Vallbona
  • Susan Beggs-Baker
  • Robert L. Baker
Part of the Medizinische Informatik und Statistik book series (MEDINFO, volume 3)

Abstract

The health care systems of most industrialized nations depend on advanced technology for the delivery of health services to individuals or to community groups. Technology oriented health systems are complex in their organization, require expensive equipment and supplies, and are heavily dependent on the availability of medical specialists and highly trained technicians. Consequently, technology oriented health care systems are very costly. Not surprisingly, the cost of health care in many countries has increased at a much higher rate than the cost of living. In the United States, the cost of health care in 1950 was estimated at $12 x 109, which represented about 4.5% of the gross national product. Ten years later, the cost had risen to $25.9 x 109, or 5% of the gross national product. During the ’60s and the first half of the ’70s there have been staggering increases in total expenditures and in the proportion of the gross national product spent in health care. Recent figures compiled by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare show that during fiscal year 1975 (from July 1, 1974 through June 30, 1975) the cost of health care was $118.5 x 109, or 8.3% of the gross national product. This is indeed a high investment in health care which represents an average annual disbursement of $547.03 per person, the expenses being much higher for the elderly (1).

Keywords

Health Care System Ambulatory Care Group Practice Primary Care Level Ambulatory Care Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Vallbona
    • 1
  • Susan Beggs-Baker
    • 1
  • Robert L. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.HoustonUSA

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