Population Growth of the Sexes

  • Leo A. Goodman
Part of the Biomathematics book series (BIOMATHEMATICS, volume 6)

Abstract

We omit a deterministic model introduced by Goodman that distinguishes between married and unmarried persons, and a simple stochastic model for the sex ratio when males and females reproduce independently but may have offspring of either sex.

Keywords

Covariance Stein Cali 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leo A. Goodman

There are no affiliations available

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