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Energy Content and Use of Solar Radiation of Fennoscandian Tundra Plants

  • F. E. Wielgolaski
  • S. Kjelvik
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 16)

Abstract

The calorific content of plant material from Finnish and Norwegian IBP tundra sites described elsewhere (Sonesson et al., 1975), and photosynthetie efficiency of plants at five of the Norwegian sites are presented. Results from other plant calorific investigations in alpine and arctic tundra are given by Bliss (1962a); Hadley and Bliss (1964); Brzoska (1971); Svoboda (1972); Muc (1972, 1973), and Pakarinen and Vitt (1974), while efficiency estimates are given by Bliss (1962b), Webber (1972), and Brzoska (1973).

Keywords

Birch Forest Alpine Plant Alpine Tundra Sedge Meadow Tundra Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. E. Wielgolaski
  • S. Kjelvik

There are no affiliations available

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