CO2 Exchange in Norwegian Tundra Plants Studied by Infrared Gas Analyzer Technique

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 16)

Abstract

The aim of the present investigation is to estimate the primary production in terms of net or apparent photosynthesis (AP) at the six IBP tundra sites at Hardangervidda described by Sonesson et al. (1975). Instead of the snowbed at Finse a locality near the lichen heath at Stigstuv was chosen. The climatic conditions at the willow thicket were close to those measured at Stigstuv (Skartveit et al., 1975).

Keywords

Biomass Dioxide Chlorophyll Transportation Glycolate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Skre

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