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Quantitative Aspects of Chemotherapy

  • A. J. Clark
Part of the Handbuch der Experimentellen Pharmakologie book series (HEP, volume 4)

Abstract

Chemotherapy is a subject of such great therapeutic importance that it deserves special consideration. Its position in relation to general pharmacology is peculiar and indeed somewhat exasperating. In the first place it may be said that Ehrlich, working on the general theory of drug action which has been followed in this article, obtained practical successes, so brilliant and important that they initiated a new science, namely that of the treatment of parasitic infections by the use of synthetic organic compounds. This line of research has during the last quarter century made numerous advances of the greatest importance to humanity. This history would suggest that chemotherapeutic results should provide basic evidence for any theory of the action of drugs based on quantitative studies. Unfortunately, however, the history of chemotherapy has repeatedly shown the curious paradox that theories which have provided brilliant practical successes have subsequently been shown to be incorrect. Chemotherapy has in fact developed as an empirical science and until recent years little has been known for certain regarding the mode of action of chemotherapeutic agents on organisms. The study of the mode of action of an organic arsenical on trypanosomes involves a whole range of difficult problems, such for instance as to whether the host activates the drug, the factors on which drug tolerance of the organism depends, etc. For these reasons it has seemed preferable to the author to treat this important but difficult problem separately and to defer its consideration until the end of this article.

Keywords

Toxic Action Quantitative Aspect Sodium Arsenite Metallic Compound Lethal Action 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Verlag von Julius Springer 1937

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.EdinburghScotland

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