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Cloning Animal Cells

  • Shirley McBride
  • Mary Heenan
  • Martin Clynes
Part of the Springer Lab Manual book series (SLM)

Abstract

The word “clone” is used to describe a cell population that has derived from a single cell. Such single cells are termed “clonogenic” and only a small proportion of normal cells and probably a higher proportion of tumor cells have the proliferative capabilities required to give rise to clones. Both normal and neoplastic stem cells may be considered clonogenic as they have the ability to renew themselves and produce descendants which differentiate.

Keywords

Conditioned Medium Feeder Layer Cloning Procedure Clonal Cell Line Silicone Grease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Heenan M, O’Driscoll L, Cleary I, Connolly L, Clynes M (1997) Isolation and characterisation of multiple clonal subpopulations of an MDR human lung cell line which exhibits significantly different levels of resistance. Int J Cancer 71: 907–915PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Meliolo G, Ratto G, Guastella M, Meta M, Biassoni R, Semino C, Casartelli G, Pasquetti W, Catrullo A, Moretta L (1994) Isolation and in vitro expansion of lymphocytes infiltrating non-small cell lung carcinoma: functional and molecular characterisation for their use in adoptive immunotherapy. Eur J Cancer 30A: 97–102CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shirley McBride
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Heenan
    • 1
  • Martin Clynes
    • 1
  1. 1.National Cell and Tissue Culture Center, Dublin City UniversityGlasnevin, Dublin 9Ireland
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, The University of Edinburgh Medical SchoolThe University of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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