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Future Aspects

  • S. Segev
  • E. Rubinstein
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 127)

Abstract

The introduction of the new fluoroquinolones into medical practice some 15 years ago raised great expectations. The fluoroquinolones were regarded as being as close as possible to the “ideal” antimicrobial agent since they possess a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, induce a low frequency of spontaneous single-step mutations, and exhibit excellent oral absorption and good tissue distribution, achieving remarkable interstitial fluid levels, adequate penetration into macrophages and other phagocytic cells and excellent urinary concentrations.

Keywords

Antimicrob Agent Mycobacterium Avium Complex Clin Microbiol Infect Lepromatous Leprosy Future Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Segev
  • E. Rubinstein

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