Acute Pancreatitis: Pathology

  • P. G. Lankisch
  • Peter A. Banks

Abstract

The histopathological evaluation of acute pancreatitis depends on the severity of the disease. We have no histologic information on lesions of the pancreas in clinically very mild acute pancreatitis, since these patients do not require surgery or die of the disease. It may be even difficult to distinguish mild acute (interstitial) pancreatitis from severe acute (necrotizing) pancreatitis because of the progressive changes seen in both forms. The two terms do not define two separate disease entities, rather only severity grades of acute autodigestive pancreatitis. Morphologically, differentiation of acute pancreatitis into mild and severe largely depends on the extension and site of fat necrosis.

Keywords

Pancreatitis Perforation Mumps 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Lankisch
    • 1
  • Peter A. Banks
    • 2
  1. 1.Medizinische KlinikStädtisches KrankenhausLüneburgGermany
  2. 2.Gastroenterology DivisionBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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