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Science and Conscience: Regulation or Guidelines for Forensic Hameogenetics?

  • M. Lorente
  • J. A. Lorente
  • B. Budowle
  • E. Villanueva
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 6)

Abstract

Since the earliest endeavors by man, there has been confrontation between the advances of science and the views and opinions of society. History is replete with examples of conflict between science (or scientists) and society, e.g., Socrates and the Athenian government, Galileo and the Church, and the use of atomic energy and the implications of world destruction. Usually technical questions are resolved, after some debate and discussion, when a general consensus is reached by the relevant scientific community. However, social opinions remain unresolved for longer periods of time and can vary substantially among peoples. These apparent conflicts are not necessarily bad, but they do pose questions for one to consider.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Legal System Technical Question Apparent Conflict Standard Operating Protocol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. McEwen JE, Reilly PR (1994) A review of State legislation on DNA forensic databank. Am J Hum Genet 54: 941–958PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Council of Europe. Committee of Minister. Recommendation No. R(92)1. — On the use of analysis of DNA within the framework of the criminal justice systems.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lorente
    • 1
  • J. A. Lorente
    • 1
  • B. Budowle
    • 2
  • E. Villanueva
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Forensic MedicineUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  2. 2.FSRTC - Research Unit.Laboratory Division. FBI AcademyQuanticoUSA

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