Prediction of Damage Evolution in Continuous Fiber Metal Matrix Composites Subjected to Fatigue Loading

  • D. Allen
  • K. Helms
  • L. Hurtado
  • D. Lagoudas
Conference paper

Abstract

A life prediction model is being developed by the authors for application to metal matrix composites (MMC’s). The systems under study are continuous silicon carbide fibers imbedded in titanium matrix. The model utilizes a computationally based framework based on thermodynamics and continuum mechanics, and accounts for matrix inelasticity, damage evolution, and environmental degradation due to oxidation. The computational model utilizes the finite element method, and an evolutionary analysis of a unit cell is accomplished via a time stepping algorithm. The computational scheme accounts for damage growth such as fiber-matrix debonding, surface cracking, and matrix cracking via the inclusion of cohesive zone elements in the unit cell. These elements are located based on experimental evidence also obtained by the authors.

The current paper outlines the formulation utilized by the authors to solve this problem, and recent results are discussed. Specifically, results are given for a four-ply unidirectional composite subjected to cyclic fatigue loading at 650°C both in air and inert gas. The effects of oxidation on the life of the composite are predicted with the model, and the results are compared to limited experimental results.

Keywords

Fatigue Titanium Carbide Argon Brittle 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Allen
    • 1
  • K. Helms
    • 1
  • L. Hurtado
    • 2
  • D. Lagoudas
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Mechanics of CompositesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Sandia National Laboratories, New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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