Reducing Risk by Controlling the Environment

  • Stan Bumble

Abstract

An analogue formulation, in its most simple form, is used to express toxicity for six mammals and eight chemical species. General control theory is discussed and the system transfer function is shown to be similar to the analogue toxicity equation. Also general kinetic equations of Lotka are of this nature. Electrical network equations can be solved for LC50/100 for man and animals in a more complex system by the network systems model of the environment. By analogy then, the system can be controlled by feedback control or any of a dozen other methods to ameliorate the overall LC50/100 of the ecological population, at any site, by reducing the emissions of specific chemicals at a site whose ecological nature is known.

Keywords

Methane Toxicity Manifold Benzene Hydrocarbon 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stan Bumble
    • 1
  1. 1.PhiladelphiaUSA

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