Experimental System for Creating New Type of N2-Fixing Plants

  • Sz. S. Varga
  • É. Preininger
  • P. Korányi
  • I. Gyurján
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 37)

Abstract

Artificial associations were established between nitrogen-fixing Azomonas or Azotobacter cells and plant tissues based on the induced carbon and energy dependency of diazotrophs on plant metabolic activity. Plant regeneration was achieved from mixed callus-bacterium associations. Light and electron microscopy was used to show the location of bacteria in intercellular spaces of callus and regenerated plant tissues. The nitrogen-fixing ability of the partnership was proved by acetylene reduction assay.

Keywords

Sugar Saccharose Lactose Cane Acetylene 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sz. S. Varga
    • 1
  • É. Preininger
    • 1
  • P. Korányi
    • 1
  • I. Gyurján
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant AnatomyEötvös Loránd UniversityBudapestHungary

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