Interactions between Partners in the Association “Wheat - Azospirillum brasilense Sp 245”

  • Vladimir Ignatov
  • Galina Stadnik
  • Olga Iosipenko
  • Nikolai Selivanov
  • Alexander Iosipenko
  • Elena Sergeeva
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 37)

Abstract

We report here on the effect of association between wheat plants and bacteria of the genus Azospirillum on the physiology and biochemistry of the associated partners. Lectin studies revealed strain-specific interaction of a wheat lectin with azospirilla. Inoculation of wheat seedlings with different Azospirillum strains and phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid) treatments brought about changes in specific lectin activity and in wheat root growth parameters. At concentrations of 0.5 – 2.0 mg/L, wheat lectin was stimulatory to the synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid in Azospirillum cells grown on a nitrogen-free medium under microaerophilic conditions. Changes in the synthesis of hydroxyproline-rich proteins and in the activities of exoglycosidases due to Azospirillum inoculation were also noted. These findings are in support of the views that the effect of Azospirillum on plants (wheat) is largely due to microbial production of indole-3-acetic acid, as well as to nitrogenase activity.

Keywords

Sugar Hydrolysis Maize Hydrate Carbohydrate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Ignatov
    • 1
  • Galina Stadnik
    • 1
  • Olga Iosipenko
    • 1
  • Nikolai Selivanov
    • 1
  • Alexander Iosipenko
    • 1
  • Elena Sergeeva
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and MicroorganismsRussian Academy of SciencesSaratovRussia

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