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Cloning of a Streptomyces Endoglucanase Gene in Azospirillum brasilense

  • Brunella Perito
  • Renato Fani
  • Giorgio Mastromei
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 37)

Abstract

The eglS gene from Streptomyces rochei A2, encoding an endoglucanase, was cloned in the conjugative vector pAF700 obtaining the 22.5 kb recombinant plasmid pCSF121. This plasmid was transferred to Escherichia coli DH1 and Azospirillum brasilense Sp6. E. coli [pCSF121] showed no endoglucanase activity, whereas A. brasilense [pCSF121] showed a low endoglucanase activity, which was cell associated. A. brasilense [pCSF121] was not able to use carboxymethyl-cellulose as carbon source. No significative difference in nitrogen fixing activity was found between A. brasilense [pCSF121] and A. brasilense [pAF700]. The different behavior of E. coli [pCSF121] and A. brasilense [pCSF121] in the expression of the eglS gene suggests that A. brasilense might recognize some Streptomyces regulative signal, i.e. for transcription, internal to the cloned fragment.

Keywords

Endoglucanase Activity Azospirillum Brasilense Endoglucanase Gene Streptomyces Genome eglS Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brunella Perito
    • 1
  • Renato Fani
    • 1
  • Giorgio Mastromei
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Animal Biology and Genetics “Leo Pardi”University of FlorenceFirenzeItaly

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