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Responses in tropospheric chemistry to changes in UV fluxes, temperatures and water vapour densities

  • Jan S. Fuglestvedt
  • Jan E. Jonson
  • Wei-Chyung Wang
  • Ivar S. A. Isaksen
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 32)

Abstract

A two-dimensional chemistry/transport model of the global troposphere is used to study the chemical response to i) increased UV radiation from stratospheric ozone depletion and ii) increased temperatures and water vapour densities that follow from increased levels of greenhouse gases. Increased UV radiation increases the photolysis rates for several tropospheric gases, in particular ozone. This leads to enhanced levels of odd hydrogen and reduced concentrations of tropospheric ozone. Increases in temperature and water vapour densities reduce the levels of tropospheric ozone through temperature dependent reaction rates and increased produetion of odd hydrogen. In both cases the methane levels are also reduced. Thus, the results indicate that the considered mechanisms constitute damping effects on global warming. For a global temperature increase of 3.88 K, the levels of tropospheric ozone and methane are reduced by about 10% and 18%, respectively.

Keywords

Total Ozone Stratospheric Ozone Tropospheric Ozone Total Ozone Column High Northern Latitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan S. Fuglestvedt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jan E. Jonson
    • 2
    • 3
  • Wei-Chyung Wang
    • 4
  • Ivar S. A. Isaksen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for International Climate and Energy Studies — Oslo (CICERO)University of OsloBlindern, OsloNorway
  2. 2.Institute for GeophysicsUniversity of OsloNorway
  3. 3.The Norwegian Meteorological InstituteNorway
  4. 4.Atmospheric Sciences Research CenterState University of New YorkUSA

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