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First Analysis of ERS-1 Altimeter Data in the Red Sea Area

  • M. S. Elsayed
  • E. Hoeck
Conference paper
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 113)

Abstract

In order to determine sea surface heights related to a geoid model for the Red Sea area [10° ≤ ϕ ≤ 36° ,26° ≤ λ ≤ 50°] ERS-1 altimeter measurements have been processed. A first analysis based on the data of the 35 day repeat cycle, covering the Red Sea area, is reported.

For the test area a total number of 72 tracks (30 north-going tracks, 42 south-going tracks) including more than 5000 data points with a resulting number of 120 cross-over points were available. In order to improve the quality of the data set (because it contains radial orbit and geoid errors due to the uncertainty of the earth gravity field) a cross-over analysis by using a hybrid norm solution is applied. It contains the combination of cross-over minimization and an a-priori geoid fitting by means of a suitable chosen weighting factor. This analysis is carried out and a root mean square (RMS) of cross-over differences is found equal to 4.2 cm. When we apply a certain weighting factor to minimize the cross-over differences, the value of RMS still remains within the centimeter range, but to optimally match the geoid model the RMS value jumps to decimeter level.

Keywords

Root Mean Square Altimeter Data Geoid Model Orbit Error Radar Altimeter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Elsayed
    • 1
  • E. Hoeck
    • 2
  1. 1.Mathematical Geodesy and GeoinformaticsTechnical University GrazAustria
  2. 2.Space Research Institute, Department of Satellite GeodesyAustrian Academy of SciencesGrazAustria

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