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Domains of Existence of the Bifurcation of a Reflected Shock Wave in Cylindrical Channels

  • V. P. Fokeev
  • S. Abid
  • G. Dupré
  • V. Vaslier
  • C. Paillard

Abstract

The bifurcation of a reflected shock wave at the end of a cylindrical shock tube has been analyzed under conditions similar to those neccessary for studying chemical reactions. The experiments have been carried out using shocks in argon, nitrogen and CH4/O2/N2 mixtures. The triple configuration, deduced from pressure signals, has been compared to configurations provided by different models. The polar method has been used to calculate the parameters of the configuration and a method for the estimation of the domain of existence of the reflected shock bifurcation has been proposed.

Key words

Shock/boundary layer interaction Triple configuration Bifurcation 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. P. Fokeev
    • 1
  • S. Abid
    • 2
  • G. Dupré
    • 2
  • V. Vaslier
    • 3
  • C. Paillard
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of High TemperaturesRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (L.C.S.R.) and UniversityOrléans Cedex 2France
  3. 3.Direction des Etudes et Techniques Nouvelles du Gaz de FranceLa Plaine Saint Denis CedexFrance

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